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China Law Blog's Christopher Cottrell scrutinizes UNSAVORY ELEMENTS under a legal lens, probing the ethics behind Graham Earnshaw’s publishing retrospective, Susie Gordon’s “fu er dai” expose, and my prostitution piece:

http://www.chinalawblog.com/2014/04/china-expats-gone-bad-a-review-of-unsavory-elements.html

“How, then, does one find transparency in China’s business and legal culture? And more specifically, how do foreigners side-step being brought along to brothels, or just say no to the narcotics in front of them, when doing business with the Chinese without wholly insulting their overly gracious (and easily offended) hosts?”

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Part 2 of business culture publication Jing Daily's coverage of UNSAVORY ELEMENTS: an excerpt from Susie Gordon’s highly-praised essay, and a short interview with me about the editing process:
http://jingdaily.com/book-excerpt-a-wild-night-out-with-chinas-luxury-loving-nouveau-riche/
"(Susie’s) was the single most difficult piece for me to commission. I wanted to tap a writer who could capture the glamour of China’s cosmopolitan cities and the extravagance of the people’s newfound luxury."

Part 2 of business culture publication Jing Daily's coverage of UNSAVORY ELEMENTS: an excerpt from Susie Gordon’s highly-praised essay, and a short interview with me about the editing process:

http://jingdaily.com/book-excerpt-a-wild-night-out-with-chinas-luxury-loving-nouveau-riche/

"(Susie’s) was the single most difficult piece for me to commission. I wanted to tap a writer who could capture the glamour of China’s cosmopolitan cities and the extravagance of the people’s newfound luxury."

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China luxury advisers Jing Daily's two-part coverage of UNSAVORY ELEMENTS. Part 1: an interview with Shanghai-based contributor Susie Gordon on her essay about Chinese tuhao (土豪) “tacky” rich.
"If you’re comfortable with your wealth and status, you don’t need to display gaudy brand names."
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An extensive interview with eChinacities, discussing the making of UNSAVORY ELEMENTS as well as my travels across China and crossing the 10-year mark as an expat here.
http://www.echinacities.com/expat-corner/Interview-Tom-Carter-Editor-of-Unsavory-Elements-Talks-About-Life-in-China
"I took a bit of an untraditional approach to editing this collection. Most commercial anthologies are just compilations of previously-published book extracts; their editors mere curators whose only role is to obtain licensing rights. I, on the other hand, sought to commission all-original writings whereby I worked closely with each contributor, nurturing their topics and crafting their words with them. So, yes, there was that intimate connection.”

An extensive interview with eChinacities, discussing the making of UNSAVORY ELEMENTS as well as my travels across China and crossing the 10-year mark as an expat here.

http://www.echinacities.com/expat-corner/Interview-Tom-Carter-Editor-of-Unsavory-Elements-Talks-About-Life-in-China

"I took a bit of an untraditional approach to editing this collection. Most commercial anthologies are just compilations of previously-published book extracts; their editors mere curators whose only role is to obtain licensing rights. I, on the other hand, sought to commission all-original writings whereby I worked closely with each contributor, nurturing their topics and crafting their words with them. So, yes, there was that intimate connection.”

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The Chinese edition of Sampan’s coverage of Unsavory Elements:
當Tom Carter 2004年到達中國以後,他不會想到那裡會成為他之後十年的家。”
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Sampan 舢板 Chinese-English newspaper was gracious enough to extend UNSAVORY ELEMENTS some bilingual coverage:

http://sampan.org/2014/04/unsavory-elements-explores-china-from-eyes-of-outsiders/

"Unsavory Elements” looks at China with brutal honesty and a sense of humor."

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Another fair review of UNSAVORY ELEMENTS from a State-operated site, China.org.cn. I suppose being banned in China would have been good for some notoriety, but it’s comforting to know that the Party’s got our unsavory backs.
http://www.china.org.cn/arts/2014-03/18/content_31820139.htm
"A surprisingly refreshing, instead of rehashing, collection of essays, written by professionals, instead of amateurs…at times hilarious, at times beautiful, but always relatable…"
Another fair review of UNSAVORY ELEMENTS from a State-operated site, China.org.cn. I suppose being banned in China would have been good for some notoriety, but it’s comforting to know that the Party’s got our unsavory backs.
"A surprisingly refreshing, instead of rehashing, collection of essays, written by professionals, instead of amateurs…at times hilarious, at times beautiful, but always relatable…"
Link

Book review: Unsavory Elements

A kind review by Shenzhen-based blogger Ray Hecht (who I understand has just signed a book deal with Blacksmith Books). “A unique book with a unique take on China, with none of the standard journalistic flair and dull economic theories. This is about real life…”

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My UNSAVORY ELEMENTS interview with gbtimes:
"I appreciate writing that’s not safe because I think for too long a lot of these mass-market memoirs about China have been safe, serving a middle-class readership."
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Over one year after it was first published, UNSAVORY ELEMENTS is still selling strong and continues to attract positive (and occasionally polemic) coverage in the international media and blogosphere. At the time I write this, the book has returned to its previously-held #1 spot on Amazon Kindle sales for the China genre (usually occupied by Big Publishing behemoths or .99-cent throwaways).

http://www.amazon.com/Unsavory-Elements-Stories-Foreigners-Loose-ebook/dp/B00DKMP0KK/

Go team! Ra ra ra! I’ll be uploading our most recent press clippings for your reading enjoyment.